Oskaloosa.com

May 6, 2013

Nelson Farm opens, exhibit changes on display

By ANDY GOODELL
The Oskaloosa Herald

OSKALOOSA — Rain didn't cause this season opening day to be a wash.

Despite a foreboding forecast on Saturday, Nelson Pioneer Farm and Museum held a season-opening ceremony at Bradbury Hall, complete with a flag raising courtesy of local Boy Scout Pack 77 Saturday morning.

Todd Koenig, Webelos den leader for Pack 77, said he trained the boys on how to properly do color guard activities.

“They're quick learners,” said Koenig.

When asked why he thought it was important for the boys to learn how to do color guard procedures, Koenig said it instills discipline and teaches them the importance of how to do color guard activities properly.

Although the live animals once scheduled for Saturday's opening were not able to be part of the day due to the weather, museum curator Kelly Halbert remained in good spirits. She said the museum, as well as all the living history displays at Nelson Pioneer Farm, remained open for the public to enjoy on Saturday.

“Really, I just put it down to a simple day,” explained Halbert. “We're set up in such a way that it's really a self-guided tour. You can wander in and out of the buildings and see what you want.”

On a regular weekday, Halbert said she's available to walk through the buildings on the property and tell visitors all she knows about them.

Since becoming curator in back in January, Halbert has rearranged a few things in the museum portion of the Nelson Pioneer Farm.

The museum includes historic artifacts from numerous eras including the Civil War and World War I. A great number of these artifacts have relevance to those who once lived in Mahaska County.

Halbert is still currently working on the museum's World War II and Native American exhibits.

“I still need to do a lot of research,” said Halbert, while discussing the Native American exhibit.

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Herald City Editor Andy Goodell can be reached at news2@oskyherald.com.