Oskaloosa.com

November 8, 2012

Similar ‘odd couples’

By ANDY GOODELL
The Oskaloosa Herald

OSKALOOSA — I hope as many of you as possible went to see the high school’s production of “The Odd Couple (Female Version)” this past weekend.

I was able to be a part of Press Night for the production this past Thursday. The actors and actresses rehearsed as I snapped photos. The story I did for the Herald can be found in the Monday, Nov. 5, issue. More photos from the production can be found on oskaloosa.com.

For those who don’t know already, the original production of “The Odd Couple” is about a pair of bachelors dealing with the realities of being single, as well as dealing with the fact that one of them is perfectionist and the other is a bit of a slob.

In the female version, all of the gender roles are reversed and the cast consists overwhelmingly of females.

What I found interesting is how easily the plot of the play can adapt to having predominantly females acting in it as opposed to males. It seems like a lot of the issues facing single people in general are shared among both genders. You know, all the cliche stuff — self doubt, concern over a recently ended relationship, etc.

What I also found interesting is the fact that being either neat or a slob is not exclusive to one gender. Both male and female versions of the play have these personality types.

The fact that there are only subtle differences between the male and female versions of “The Odd Couple” really tells me something — that men and women aren’t really that different in a lot of ways. Now, I’m not trying to get on some pedestal here and preach gender equality to you. I’m just saying that men and women have a lot in common, especially when it comes to dealing with roommates whose personalities are very different from our own.

Although both the male and female versions of “The Odd Couple” are meant to include personalities that are somewhat more pronounced for the sake of comedy, I think we’ve all known neat freaks and slobs in real life.

A lot of college students or other individuals in early adulthood have to deal with their roommates’ habits as well as the perils of single life. That’s probably why both the female and male versions of “The Odd Couple” are such enduring productions. Who can’t relate to having an annoying roommate?